How does the AUTOSAR Ecosystem Impact Requirement Engineering?

AUTOSAR aims at facilitating reuse of standardized software components in automotive software development. For this, it defines three layers: the application components (with standardized interfaces between components), the (standardized) runtime environment, and the basic software (which abstracts the hardware and contains the driver modules). Despite this standardization, the combination of application components, runtime and basic software should still offer differentiating functionality for cars. In an exploratory study, we found this situation challenging for Requirements Engineering practice, where standard requirements implied by the AUTOSAR standard should be treated differently from OEM specific requirements targeted towards differentiation or innovation features.

We will discuss our preliminary findings at the 23rd IEEE International Requirements Conference 2015 in Ottawa, Canada during the poster and tool demo session as well as our method in the 5th IEEE International Workshop on Empirical Requirements Engineering.

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Survey on daily pains with requirements

What are your daily pains with requirements? A survey on problems with Requirements Engineering in the automotive domain

We, a group of researchers from Chalmers | University of Gothenburg in Sweden, are currently studying problems that occur in automotive Requirements Engineering. This means both during the elicitation of requirements and later on when using requirements for development, validation, etc.

In this context we are looking for people working at automotive companies (OEMs, Suppliers, Consultancies) who get into contact with requirements of any form. This could be requirements engineers, who are actually eliciting requirements, but also software or verification engineers, who implement or test based on requirements.

We will use the data to validate challenges previously extracted from qualitative interview data and complement them with quantitative data. The results will be compiled into a scientific publication.

The survey should not take more than 20 minutes to answer. It would be incredibly valuable for the scientific community if you could share your experiences with us! The survey starts on 7th July 2015 and ends on 7th September 2015.

Survey Link: https://www.soscisurvey.de/challRE15

If you have any questions, feedback, or concerns, please feel free to contact:
Grischa Liebel, Matthias Tichy, or Eric Knauss
Software Engineering Division, Computer Science and Engineering
Chalmers & University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Supporting Requirements Feedback Flows in Iterative System Development

Complex, inter-connected systems make it hard to do upfront requirements analysis, as many requirements only surface when the system is used in its intended context. Does this mean that engineers cannot rely on systematic requirements approaches? Based on a case study at Volvo Cars we say “no”.

Agility does not have to contradict systematic RE!

Iterative development and field tests with early versions of the system are a great chance for requirements engineering! We will discuss our findings at REFSQ conference in Essen:

Knauss, E.; Andersson, A.; Rybacki, M. & Israelsson, E. Research Preview: Supporting Requirements Feedback Flows in Iterative System Development. Proceedings of 21st International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality (REFSQ’ 15), 2015 Continue reading

REFSQ 15 Poster Deadline: 2 Days Left

Just a quick reminder that the poster deadline for REFSQ 15 is approaching quickly (this Friday!). You have great ideas that you want to share with the Requirements Engineering Community? The REFSQ Poster Session might just be the right venue, offering a great spotlight for original and innovative works even in early stages. In addition to the poster session during the main conference, we will have highly visible lightning talks to draw attention to your work! Read more in the call for posters.

Towards Enabling Cross-Organizational Modeling in Automotive Ecosystems

This summer, I visited Canada as an international collaborator of NECSIS (Network for the Engineering of Complex Software-Intensive Systems for Automotive Systems) with the goal to identify synergies between my involvement in software center projects with Swedish industry (especially the Ecosystemability Assessment Method). We found that to a large extent partner industries of the NECSIS project recognize the same opportunities and challenges as Swedish industry, when it comes to engineering tomorrow’s complex software-centric systems.These stem in particular from the fact that development will increasingly be distributed over several organizations and that reliability and efficiency of development needs to be addressed across organizational borders. We will present preliminary results and future plans this week in the context of this work at MD2P2 Workshop at MoDELS 2014. Continue reading